Yellowfin Tuna



The yellowfin tuna is a type of tuna eaten by humans as food. It is found in open waters of tropical and subtropical seas worldwide, though not in the Mediterranean Sea. It is an epipelagic fish ranging in the top 330 feet of the water column. It has been reported to be up to 239 cm (94 inches) in length and 200 kg (440 lb) in weight.

The second dorsal fin and the anal fin are both bright yellow, thus the common name, and can be very long in mature specimens, as are the pectoral fins. The main body is very dark metallic blue, changing to silver on the belly, which also has about 20 vertical lines.

Yellowfins tend to school with fishes of the same size, including other species of tuna, and larger fish are often seen with dolphins, porpoises, whales and whale sharks. Yellowfins eat other fish, crustaceans, and squid.

Commercial fisheries catch yellowfin tuna with encircling nets (purse seines) and with longlines. The fish are mainly sold in frozen or canned form, but are also popular as sashimi.

Yellowfin tuna are a popular sport fish in many parts of their range and are prized for their speed and strength when fought on rod and reel as well as for their table qualities.

Yellowfin is also popular in restaurants as the primary protein in an entree; presented in much the same fashion as fine red meat, it is often cooked seared to rare to medium-rare, though it takes on a rich flavor similar to tri-tip when cooked through.Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, with no Front-Cover Texts, and with no Back-Cover Texts.
Virtual Magic is a human knowledge database blog. Text Based On Information From Wikipedia, Under The GNU Free Documentation License. Copyright (c) 2007 Virtual Magic. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".

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